Work experience students visit SSI

This week Save Sight Institute had the pleasure of hosting three students from Alexandria Park Community School for their Year 10 work experience.

This week Save Sight Institute had the pleasure of hosting three students from Alexandria Park Community School for their Year 10 work experience.

Tariq, Christopher and Maha all gained hands-on experience over five days under the guidance of  staff across a range of departments in the Institute. A rotating program was developed to ensure the students had an informative and interesting work experience over the week.

The students spent time in the busy eye clinic, observing orthoptists and electrophysiology technicians as they cared for patients. They were lucky enough to gain hands-on experience operating the ophthalmic equipment in the clinic, and developed skills by role-playing both patient and orthoptist.

But of course, what is work experience at the Save Sight Institute without experiencing its world-class laboratories?!

The students dressed in white lab coats and participated in experiments. They were also able to observe important scientific procedures which included cell culture work, staining and microscopy.

According to Tariq, Christopher and Maha “This was a great experience, and something we will always remember. It will help us in our science studies, and we really appreciate the people we met at SSI and the time they gave us.”

We thank Tariq, Christopher and Maha for their willingness to learn and experience what we have to offer at the Institute. Hopefully we will see you back here in the future as next-generation scientists and researchers!

 

Lions Clubs donate $140K ophthalmic equipment to SSI

Last week, Save Sight Institute was honoured to welcome two senior members of Lions Clubs to officially present the Institute and its patients with an ultra-widefield retinal imaging device, amounting to a total donation of almost $140K.

Last week, Save Sight Institute was honoured to welcome two senior members of Lions Clubs to officially present the Institute and its patients with an ultra-widefield retinal imaging device, amounting to a total donation of almost $140K. The Optos 200TX enables ophthalmologists to see more of a patients eye, leading to earlier diagnosis of eye disease and better outcomes.

“Conventional methods allow us to view approximately 45 degrees of the retina” said director of Save Sight Institute Professor Peter McCluskey, “but with this sophisticated camera we can see 200 degrees of the retina in just one image.”

The Optos 200TX was fully funded through the combined fundraising efforts of NSW Parliamentary Lions Club, the Lions Clubs International Foundation, Australian Lions Foundation and the Lions Clubs NSW/ACT Save Sight Foundation.

The Hon. Stephen Bromhead from the NSW Parliamentary Lions Club attended the presentation and said that from a government perspective, the partnership of like-minded community groups working together to improve capacity in the eye health sector is invaluable. “Lions Clubs have a long and proud history of supporting the work of organisations and people who are at the frontline of fighting blindness and vision loss. It’s an honour to be able to contribute to the great work by donating this piece of essential equipment.”

Also present was Mr Jean-Claude LeGrande from the Lions NSW/ACT Save Sight Foundation who handed over the final installment cheque for the equipment, saying “We are so pleased to be involved at the beginning of a patients journey, helping to ensure that they have the most accurate and timely diagnosis possible to enable appropriate treatment to save their vision.”

The 200TX device was designed specifically for ophthalmologists and vitreo retina specialists. It helps practitioners discover more evidence of disease, guiding their treatment decisions. The ultra-widefield digital scanning laser technology acquires images to support the detection, diagnosis, analysis, documentation and management of ocular pathology and systemic disease that may first present in the periphery. These conditions may otherwise go undetected.