Know your risks this World Glaucoma Week

It’s World Glaucoma Week (6-12 March) and we at Save Sight Institute would like to take the opportunity to share some important facts about this degenerative eye disease.

It’s World Glaucoma Week (6-12 March) and we at Save Sight Institute would like to take the opportunity to share some important facts about this degenerative eye disease.

  • Around 400,000 Australians have glaucoma;
  • Around 50% of sufferers are undiagnosed;
  • People with family history of glaucoma are ten times more likely to develop the disease, as are diabetics and short-sighted people; 
  • Glaucoma costs the Australian economy approximately two billion dollars a year; 
  • Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. 
Glaucoma involves the slow degeneration of the optic nerve at the back of the eye.
Vision is lost slowly from the side (peripherally) and unless checked most people are unaware that their sight is disappearing because one eye compensates for the other.Damage is irreversible, but if detected early, treatment can slow down the damage process.
 
According to Glaucoma Australia, although anyone can get glaucoma, people with a higher risk include those with:
  • family history;
  • diabetes
  • migraine
  • short sightedness (myopia)
  • long signtedness (hyperopia)
  • eye injuries
  • blood pressure problems
  • past or present use of cortisone drugs (steroids).
It’s recommended that people in these groups should have their eyes checked no later than the age 35. For most other people they should have their eyes checked for glaucoma by the time they reach 40.
 
Save Sight Institute is focused on finding a cure for glaucoma so that people throughout the world, now and in the future, can avoid vision loss. 
 
To help us find a cure, please support our research by making a tax deductible donation.
 
Together we can help more people to see the future. 
Picture of man with t-shirt that says "I hope glaucoma does not stop me from driving my grandson to soccer training"